Deutsch Country Days

 Join MO-GERMANS at the largest German Living History Event in the Midwest on October 21 & 22!  ! https://www.deutschcountrydays.org/

Back in the mid-1970s our country was celebrating its Bi-Centennial everywhere. History

was alive! Robert and Lois Hostkoetter had found the old Huber Log Cabin from Perry County and rebuilt it on their property in southern Warren County near Lake Creek where the Germans had first settled. In love with Eric Sloane’s Covered Bridges they had added that to the farm as well. They wanted to share their passion for history, the Eric SloaneGerman heritage and their “Luxenhaus Farm” and help others understand and learn it as well. And so Deutsch Country Days was born. They followed this with the eighteen Missouri log structures from Gasconade, St. Charles, St. Louis and Warren Counties — all originally built from 1800 – 1860. These buildings became “LUXENHAUS FARM,” Platt Deutsch (Low German) for “log house farm.” Made with all the hard work and love this dedicated couple could give.

Each year on the third weekend of October people come from all over the world to share in this experience. The Luxenhaus Farm comes alive as a German settlement of the 1800s! You and your family, your children and your grandchildren become immersed in what life was like for the Germans as they settled Missouri. Grandma’s cabin is filled with quilter’s, weavers and spinners who lovingly demonstrate these early crafts. Nearby the mules work the Sourghum press to create

this very necessary commodity used in place of sugar. Further up the hill you will hear the steam engine driving the mill creating the beauty that filled their homes.

Steam mill

As you make your way further you encounter the passionate crafters that have been teaching Bobbin Lace, Candle dipping and Blacksmithing….long forgotten crafts in this

world of technology and iPads. The smell of wood fire fills the air as the Apple Butter churn is worked. This makes you hungry but don’t despair, the local youth organizations MUSIChave prepared some great food that you can enjoy right there. Music fills the air. You need to plan Trapperon spending the entire day. There will be a time and a place for the Trappers of the Starved Rock who have been sharing the days of the fur traders, and the Osage Village as well, to take you even further back in time. In case you prefer, the American Civil War you will find that being shared as well.

Hundreds of volunteers have been making this weekend come alive for over 35 years, and we can be thankful of all of their dedication to history. So many of the crafts provide

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a hands on opportunity for your children and your grandchildren to enjoy and appreciate. There is no other event quite like Deutsch Country Days! Wilkommen!!!

Ralph and Me
Dorris Keeven-Franke and Ralph Gregory

 

Please join me and all of the Missouri Germans and take a step into this window through time. The farm is part of Missouri’s German Heritage Corridor.GHC logo You can learn more about the event at their website https://www.deutschcountrydays.org/ or follow them on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/deutschcountrydays/ or you can call them at 636-443-5669!  One thing you must know as well… leave your technology at home… as this is a place where smart phones don’t work and the internet and charge cards don’t reach.  See you at Deutsch Country Days!!!

 

Dee Dann
Deutsch Country Days by artist Dee Dann

Coming to America

In the decade of the 1830s alone over 120,000 Germans immigrated to America, and one-third of those settled in Missouri. Those are the emigrants that made it. Thousands would not survive the journey at sea or the difficult overland trek westward.

Nicholas Krekel: “In the fall of the year 1832 we sailed from Bremen. It took about three months, we landed at New York, went up the Hudson River to Albany, and from Albany to Nicholas KrekelErie by canal. Intending to go to Cleveland Ohio from there and to Missouri. On arriving at Erie, there was so much ice in the lake that we could not make the trip, so we went overland to Pittsburgh Pennsylvania, a distance of 160 miles. Mother, my sister Katherine (11 years), myself (Nicholas Krekel) rode in the wagon. Father, my three oldest brothers, Godfred [sic], Arnold and Frank walked. On this overland trip my mother took cold which continued to get worse when coming down the Ohio River, so we landed at Louisville, Kentucky to get medical assistance and religious consolation. She died there on December 14, 1832 and was also buried there. Three years later Arnold went there to find his mother’s grave but the city had been built beyond it. The voyage across the Ocean took 9 weeks, the overland trip from Erie to Pittsburgh took about 3 weeks. After her burial we continued our way to St. Louis. On arriving there we put up at the William Tell house on Main Street, a two story stone building.” 

Of the forty thousand immigrants that arrived in Missouri in the ’30s, at least one-fourth of those Germans chose the city of St. Louis. The city’s population grew from approximately 15,000 to 35,000, meaning that half of that growth was by Germans alone. The city’s Germans were often affluent and educated, supporting six German newspapers. The sound of German voices filled the air and it was said one could spend the day and never hear a word of English.

“From there we came to St. Charles and were there during the Christmas holidays and New Year. A man from the western part of the county named Cashew and his son named Jackson were there with a team of four horses having been to St. Louis. They took us to our new home. While looking about for a location we stopped with a man named Bonet, a bachelor that made spinning wheels (the place was later owned by the Braehus family) he showed my father a piece of land owned by the government on which a man named Wood had built a log house. After looking at the land which was covered with heavy timber my father went to St. Louis where the land office was and bought it for the sum of $__for ____ acres. He paid the man Wood $9 for the log cabin that was on it, he seemed well paid and settled further towards Warren County”

Warren County had been carved out of Montgomery County in 1833. St. Charles County which had been created out of the St. Charles District of the Louisiana Territory in 1812 had stretched to the Pacific Ocean until the counties like Montgomery and Franklin were cropped-cropped-1823-missouricreated in 1818. At least 30,000 German immigrants chose to go west in the 1830s, settling in St. Charles, Warren, Franklin and Gasconade counties. They settled along the Missouri River valley creating the towns of Dutzow, Dortmund and Hamburg. They helped the town of Washington grow and become a German town. They turned The Philadelphia Settlement Society into the German town of Hermann.

“The name of the vessel we came to America in was Isabella. Two years later Anton Hoester’s father and family came over in the same vessel. In the year 1835 it was wrecked at sea. Before leaving Europe my father had decided to settle in this neighborhood. A criminal Judge named Duden with whom my father was personally acquainted had come to America several years previous and wrote such favorable letters to Europe that my [father] thought well of this country”

In 1829, Gottfried Duden published A Report on a Journey to the Western States of North America and a Stay Along the Missouri (During the years 1824, ’25,’26., 1827). ReportBorn in Remscheid in 1789, the young attorney had lived with the farmer Jacob Haun, even though he had purchased a large parcel of land himself. Observing the life of the “American farmer” and describing the life of Missouri’s earliest residents Duden described a place where freedom and opportunity were almost taken for granted, causing some Germans to decry Duden’s description as an impossible fairy tale.

“On our way there through St. Charles County we passed prairie lands that now are fine farms, but we were under the impression that where no trees grew, no vegetables would grow. So we settled in the dense forest and it took several years of hard labor to clear the land, burn the logs and the brush. Many large walnut trees were cut and burned.”

Duden’s farm was approximately 50 miles west of St. Louis on the eastern edge of Warren County adjoining St. Charles County, near the Missouri River. In 1832, a group of Germans often referred to as “the Berlin Society” made the first German settlement in Missouri when a town named Dutzow was established here. The village is named after the former estate in Germany of its founder, Johann Wilhelm Bock and adjoins Duden’s farm to the south.

“In sight of our home in Germany was the home of Carl Deus. Carl’s father was a brewer, distiller and coal merchant. The family was quite wealthy and of high social class.”

The conditions in Germany were desperate following the Napoleonic War, leading to overpopulation and famine. Revolutions were stirring among the students, and hundreds of such books as Duden’s were being written about Russia, Brazil, and England as places to immigrate to.

“In the year 1832 when Carl’s father heard that our family intended going to America he asked my father to wait until ’34 when there was a colony coming over, but my father was of a disposition not inclined to subject himself to anothers’ dictation so came alone with his family”

The Giessen Emigration Society  was founded by friends of the Krekel family, Paul Follenius and Friedrich Muench, whose farms adjoined Duden’s to the north. Their arrival in Missouri in July and August of 1834 brought over 500 Germans who settled all over St. Charles County, including St. Paul, Cottleville and St. Charles. By 1850 St. Charles County was over 50% German with many of them being established second generation families.

Next: Life of a German Immigrant Family

This is the voice of Nicholas Krekel and the story as told to his daughter Bertha Krekel. He was the founder of O’Fallon, Missouri, born in Germany on August 30, 1825 and emigrated with his family to America in 1832. The story was shared in his final years just shortly before his death. The journal has been graciously shared with me by a descendant, John Griesenauer. The author extends her utmost appreciation for allowing her to share this wonderful piece of family history.

From: https://stcharlescountyhistory.org/ 

German-American Heritage Survey

Missouri Germans Consortium is so excited to share the German-American Heritage Foundation’s recent announcement!  Today President Marc Wheat shared in his President’s message “I am very pleased to announce the appointment of Dorris Keeven-Franke, of St. Charles, Missouri to chair a key program of our 40th Me in blueanniversary year, the German-American Heritage Survey. Through this initiative, historic landmarks, organizations, and other sites of interest to German Americans throughout the United States will be identified as a first step toward preserving this heritage for future generations. Keeven-Franke worked closely with the Missouri Humanities Council beginning in April 2015 on the Missouri German Heritage Corridor, gathering a database of important sites that record the westward settlement of German-speaking Americans. Keeven-Franke will bring those same skills to lead a large team to compile a nationwide survey of all things German across the United States, modeled on the Missouri Humanities German Heritage Corridor designated by Missouri Governor Jay Nixon on July 1, 2016.”

More information and ways to volunteer will be posted at http://www.gahmusa.org/  and https://germanamericanheritagesurvey.com/

 

Missouri’s German Heritage

Missouri is the state where “the Sun of Freedom shines” according to Friedrich Muench, co-founder of the Giessen Emigration Society in 1834. This land was uncharted, fertile, inexpensive and  wide open. young attorney named Gottfried Duden from Remscheid Germany had taken notice of this newly formed State called Missouri just five years earlier.  When he published a small book on the subject in 1829, A Report on a Journey to the Western States of North America he described what some referred to as a veritable Garden of Eden, with rolling hills, wide fertile river valleys and acre upon acre of inexpensive land. Even better, was the land came with all of those American freedoms called Democracy, where one had the right to vote and the ability to pursue the American dream. This book was an instant best-seller! Just the right words at just the right time.  And a new floodgate for German emigrants was opened. Within the decade of the 1830s over 120,000 Germans would emigrate to the United States with over a third of those settling in the State of Missouri, and many coming because of Duden’s book.
“In 2015, Missouri Humanities Council Executive Director Dr. Steve Belko recognized the amount of German heritage that filled the State and began the German Heritage Corridor of Missouri inventory. With Missouri’s General Assembly also recognizing the importance of its’ German heritage, the sixteen counties of Boone, Chariton, Saline, Lafayette, Cooper, Howard, Moniteau, Cole, Callaway, Osage, Gasconade, Warren, Montgomery, Franklin, St. Charles, St. Louis and the City of St. Louis were officially signed into being by Governor Nixon on July 1, 2016 as the German Heritage Corridor. In MO_GHC_logothe Fall/Winter issue of the Missouri Humanities magazine, Belko states “Although the particulars of this story center on Missouri, the Missouri Humanities Council expects national and even transatlantic interest in this project, due to both its scale and the vast percentage of Americans who trace their ancestry to Germany”.

The Corridor’s inventory explores the State’s heritage in five phases: Early Settlement 1819-1848, Revolutionary 1848-1875, Growth and Prosperity 1875-1914, Gilded Age from 1914-1945and Modern which is post 1945. To better understand and interpret these phases in Missouri’s history the project uses five themes to guide it: Environment (which includes the parks and trails), Demographics, Work and Technology, Institutions and Values. According to Belko, all of this combined gives us a much greater picture of the state’s German heritage. From the little village of Dutzow, where they first settled alongside Duden’s Missouri farm, to the huge City of St. Louis, this heritage can still be found today. It is heard at the St. Charles Oktoberfest in the fall and or Hermann’s Maifest in the spring. It is tasted in the wineries near Augusta, which lies in the first such designated American Viticultural Area in the U.S., or inthe breweries in St. Louis. It is also heard in the voices of the Dammenchor as they practice in the German Cultural Society’s hall, or the young children’s voices as they practice their German at the St. Louis German School. Sometimes, we come upon it by surprise when we discover the German settlement of Munichburg inside Jefferson City, our State Capitol. Perhaps we will find it in the St. Paul High school in the City of Concordia … which is on one end of the Corridor, as its history ties it with the Concordia Seminary in St. Louis at the other end.

From one end of our State to another, Missouri’s German heritage encompasses more than just the Corridor, its inventory gathers the stories, the history, the festivals and the places that help us to identify with our German ancestry. Collecting the organizations that still exist, some of which are nearly 200 years old such as the St. Louis Liederkranz, help us to better understand our ancestor’s lives. This German American identity is what sets us apart and makes us proud. We take pride in this heritage and celebrate its history. We want to continue to share and impart these stories so that the next generation and many more after that, can also share in this story and take pride in this heritage. When our ancestors left Germany’s shores, they came packed with all of this. Today, we must take responsibility and see that it is not lost. We must first gather this information and slowly unpack it and share it, then celebrate it, in order that all future generations may then know and appreciate our German American heritage.” 

The German American Heritage Foundation’s Ambassador Magazine

Immigrants and Refugees

[This is a re-post of our May 2, 2014 post that we felt has become even more relative today and needed to be said again. America’s strength is in its’ diversity.]

This grapevine is growing on a trellis on the island of Harriersand in the Weser River near Bremen, Germany. Not where you expect grapevines, but these are very hardy, and from Missouri, just like the German Utopischer Weinanbau - Harriersandemigrants that gathered there as members of the Giessen Emigration Society, in 1834.  Looking forward to a new life in Missouri, “where the sun of freedom shines” their ship, the Olbers had left with one woman ill on board, and  her disease spread like wildfire, nearly killing the entire ship.  The second group was just beginning to gather in Bremen 180 years ago, only to soon learn that the ship that they’d booked, would never arrive. They would spend weeks on the island, some families even taking shelter in the huge old hausbarn on the island. Others pitched tents and some who could afford to found lodging in the nearby village of Brake.  An emigrant needs all the funds they have saved for that new life.

Unless you have emigrated from one country to another, it is difficult to understand all one faces.  On one level, there is the heated discussions with family and friends, if one’s chosen to share that plan. Some don’t because of this. When the Giessen Emigration Society left Germany, there were close friends very angry with the leaders, Muench and Follenius’ and their decision, labeling them traitors to “the cause”. Some of these same friends would be imprisoned and executed within two years.  Others considered them leaving for an impossible dream, a Utopia.

On another more personal level when one is leaving behind all that one knows, whether good or bad, and giving up all one possesses in the world, it takes a great leap of faith.  One hopes one will find one’s destination everything needed, and hoped for. When one arrives, one often faces discrimination; labeled an illegal emigrant when one isn’t, simply because of a name, one’s  appearance or birthplace.

Others don’t understand how often emigrants make the best U.S. citizens. Why?  Because an immigrant has chosen, worked hard, saved, and has given up everything to be a citizen. Immigrants often know the Declaration of Independence better than a natural born citizen. Why? Because they studied it, believed in it and chose the U.S. because of those words.  Immigrants are very hardy stockholders in a better future for the U.S., because they have already paid a high price to make it their own.

One cannot go back.  America is a melting pot for so many, as nearly all of our families were immigrants once. Once our own ancestors came here with their own dreams pinned with hope for a better future.

Monika’s Blues

On the Trail of the German Harmonica and African-American Blues Culture

A new book out by writer Herbert Quelle is now available on Amazon. Walter, a 70-year old herbert-with-bookGerman-American retired teacher, travels from his hometown in Chicago to the Mississippi Delta. On the way he befriends an African-American family who shares his interest in the importance of the harmonica in Blues music. Walter’s conversations with them and his frequent inner-monologues communicate facts and figures about the history of the instrument, the Blues and exemplary Blues harmonica players. These are interwoven with historical events relevant to the struggle for freedom by African Americans everywhere.

Quelle:  After 2 1/2 years of preparation (researching, writing, editing with peers, searching for a publisher) my book is finally on the US market. Missouri Germans wants to let you know about this new book, and that it is now available for purchase on Amazon at https://www.amazon.com/dp/1880788276/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1485287836&sr=1-1-fkmr0&keywords=Monica%27s+Blues+Quelle

 

Utopia – and the Power of Partnership

During the summer of 2009, I received an unusual email from Peter Roloff asking “if there was anything left of the Germans in Missouri?”  Not knowing Herr Roloff, I thought the question strange, wondering where on earth was this person that they would ask such a question.  Roloff was in Berlin, Germany and was head of the Traveling Sommer-Republik, a group of Germans interested specifically in the Giessen Emigration Society. I answered his email immediately with “of course! Missouri is very German!”.

The TSR had come together, after a question from Roloff’s close friend and script writer, Henry Schneider, asking him if he was aware of a group of over five-hundred Germans called the Giessen Emigration Society who had fled Germany in 1834. There had been summer

Inselkongress-2005-Roloff-und-Behnecke

meetings in Bremen of Germans focused on the GES since 2004. Back in 1833, an emigration society had been formed by two young Germans, Paul Follenius (brother of Karl Follen) and Friedrich Muench, best friends, brother-in-laws, and former students at the University of Giessen. After reading Gottfried Duden’s Report on Missouri in 1829, and several years of youthful energy and involvement in the failed Revolution of 1832 Follenius had agreed to join his friend Muench if their project could be “done on a grand scale” so that many could benefit.

When founders Muench and Follenius published A Call for an Emigration at Large hoping to convince a few of their youthful friends to join them in September of 1833, they were amazed when thousands from all walks of life, and religions, wanted to join them. Plans began in earnest, the rules and Statutes were established and the lives, and the lives of their descendants, would be changed forever. Murphy’s Law establishes that everything does not always go as planned, and this group was certainly no exception. Their story as emigrants is dramatic and inspirational, as an example of what emigrants from Germany to the U.S. experienced in the 19th Century. It is the power of over 500 Germans who came together with one dream. The Germans that would remain behind, as their descendants today will explain, described the group as going to “their Utopia.” A fact that many Americans today have forgotten, is that America would ever even be considered such a place.

The TSR’s own adventure began that summer with their own visit to Missouri that they called “A Trip to a Forgotten Utopia” that was filmed for their fellow researchers A Trip to A Forgotten Utopia(writers, artists, screen writers, photographers) back home. When the film was released at the next gathering of the TSR in 2010 I was invited to join them in Bremen. I was amazed to find myself in a film of my own back yard, explaining history of Missouri, to hundreds of Germans who were extremely interested, knowledgeable and aware of the story!  In the days that followed our conversations led to a discussion to doing more collaborations. In 2011, the TSR would return to Missouri and with the Missouri Germans Consortium, would share the story and generate even more interest in the collaborative project..

The discussions, and back and forth and subsequent visits, led to a decision to produce a collaborative book, in both English and German, that was about the GES, by writers and scholars who had studied the group and the subject. Then, Roloff secured funding for the

unnamed-2
Utopia: November 1, 2013 – April 19, 2015

project from Germany!  This led to the exhibit Utopia – Revisiting a German State in America being produced and touring across Germany. Friends in the U.S. at the German-American Heritage Museum in Washington, D.C. and the Missouri History Museum in St. Louis Missouri wanted to bring the film, book, and exhibit to America, and the collaborative cooperation between Germany and the U.S. continued. The entire project was successful, as it toured, bringing the subject of German emigration to the U.S. and using the Giessen Emigration Society as an example, to nearly 100,000 people across both countries.

This story reminds us that we were all most likely, once an emigrant. To flee one’s country, the only home one has known, and to leave one’s family, friends and treasures behind, is not a decision made lightly. To place faith and hope in a dream that they will find refuge in a safe haven for one’s family is all one dares to wish for. My favorite quote, by Winston Churchill is “The farther back you can look, the farther forward you are likely to see.” speaks to this issue. As I look back today on the close of Utopia, just one year ago in America, I see a Germany experiencing a similar situation to what Missouri and the U.S. did in the 19th Century, as millions of refugees seek a safe haven.

The pride that we Americans feel in being considered a Utopia when we hear the story of the Giessen Emigraton Society, is the same pride that the thousands of Germans welcoming refugees today feel, and one day thousands of their children will feel. They will be descendants of those today in Germany that are “stepping up to the plate” as we Americans call it, to “do the right thing”. The entire world watches, and hopes and dreams for peace. A lasting peace that will allow those who have fled to return to their homeland safely.

America no longer has the open door that allowed the Giessen Emigration Society and millions of more emigrants to come in the 19th Century. But I believe that the American spirit that makes us want to help our fellow man is still alive. Hopefully, while some choose to help those here at home, some will recall their ancestors and their struggle. German is still the largest ethnic group in America, and if they can look back, then the vision going forward could really be a brighter one for millions of refugees. While an emigrant chooses a destination and is hoping to make a new home, a refugee flees for many of the same reasons, only with hopes to return home someday. I believe that the human spirit  and desire to help, no matter what one’s race or religion, remains alive in people of all countries. The Utopia exhibition is an example of what can happen when a few people work together in a collaboration, just imagine what the world would be like today if entire countries could work together in a partnership like this.

German Heritage Corridor of Missouri

We were so pleased to hear that Gov. Nixon signed the German Heritage Corridor into law on July 1, 2016. Congratulations to the Missouri Humanities Council!

The Missouri Humanities Council is implementing a heritage tourism initiative highlighting Missouri Humanities Council logoMissouri’s German culture and history along the Missouri River. Beginning in the 1830s, thousands of German immigrants moved to Missouri in several large groups. They were inspired in part by a favorable report of the area by Gottfried Duden of Warren County, and by the resemblance of the MissouriMO_GHC_logo_concepts-2 River Valley to the Rhineland. By 1860, Germans comprised more than half of Missouri’s foreign-born residents. They brought their distinctive German culture with them, including wine and beer making, agriculture, festivals, language, religion, customs, and architecture, leaving an indelible imprint on Missouri and the nation.

While pockets of German settlement developed throughout Missouri, the majority of immigrants settled along the Missouri River. Thus the German Heritage Corridor will focus on 16 counties north and south of the Missouri River, from St. Charles and St. Louis, to Chariton and Saline. Along this corridor, distinctly German communities grew up and still exist today, including New Melle, Hermann, Dutzow, and Westphalia, to name only a few. This project will connect these communities along scenic byways, showcasing their specific German heritage and creating a corridor designed to increase tourism in the region.

We urge you to contact them today and share your story!  Missouri Humanities Council

mhc_germanheritage_brochure1

Emigrants hope for a better future

This grapevine above is growing on a trellis on the island of Harriersand in the Weser River near Bremen. Not where you expect grapevines, but these are very hardy. Like the German emigrants that gathered here as members of the Giessen Emigration Society, in 1834, looking forward to a new life in Missouri, “where the sun of freedom shines”. Their ship, the Olbers had left with one woman ill on board, disease spread like wildfire, nearly killing the entire ship.  The second group was just beginning to gather in Bremen 180 years ago, only to soon learn that the ship that they’d booked, would never arrive. They would spend weeks on the island, some families even taking shelter in the huge old hausbarn on the island. Others pitched tents and some who could afford to, found lodging in the nearby village of Brake.  An emigrant needs all the funds they have saved for that new life.

Unless you have emigrated from one country to another, it is difficult to understand all one faces.  On one level, there is the heated discussions with family and friends, if one’s chosen to share that plan. Some don’t because of this. When the Giessen Emigration Society left Germany, there were close friends very angry with the leaders, Muench and Follenius’ and their decision, labeling them traitors to “the cause”. Some of these same friends would be imprisoned and executed within two years.  Others considered them leaving for an impossible dream, a Utopia.

On another more personal level when one is leaving behind all that one knows, whether good or bad, and giving up all one possesses in the world, it takes a great leap of faith.  One hopes one will find one’s destination everything needed, and hoped for. When one arrives, one often faces discrimination; labeled an illegal emigrant when one isn’t, simply because of a name, one’s  appearance or birthplace.

Others don’t understand how often emigrants make the best U.S. citizens. Why?  Because an immigrant has chosen, worked hard, saved, and has given up everything to be a citizen. Immigrants often know the Declaration of Independence better than a natural born citizen. Why? Because they studied it, believed in it and chose the U.S. because of those words.  Immigrants are very hardy stockholders in a better future for the U.S., because they have already paid a high price to make it their own.

One cannot go back.  America is a melting pot for so many, as nearly all of our families were immigrants once. Once our own ancestors came here with their own dreams pinned with hope for a better future.

Giessen Emigration Society boarding the Medora at Bremen in July 1834
Giessen Emigration Society boarding the Medora at Bremen in July 1834

German-American Day

Missouri Governor Eric Greitens has declared Saturday, October 7, German American Day in Missouri!

All of the St. Louis Regional German-American organizations will celebrate the occasion at the St. Louis German American Cultural Society’s Donau Park 5020 West Four Ridge Road, in Jefferson County, 63051.

Saturday, Oct 7 – noon to 11 p.m. It’s German American Day!!  Meet various German Groups in the St. Louis Metro area. Music by Echoes of the Past in the afternoon and The Wendl Band in the evening. 

Menu is Schwienebraten (grilled pork), Bratwurst and Weisswurst dinners/sandwiches served with sides of Beet Salad and Potato Salad.  Strudel and German drink will be served. 

Admission and parking are free.  We will be serving delicious authentic Oktoberfest food and drink.   Enjoy continuous entertainment both days, including traditional music, German singing. and German folk dancing performances.

The Donau Park is located at 5020 West Four Ridge Road, House Springs, MO 63051.  

For directions to the Donau Park or more information about the German Cultural Society, visit our website http://www.germanstl. org.

Please, no pets.  Service animals permitted.

In 1983, President Ronald Reagan proclaimed October 6 as German-American Day to celebrate and honor the 300th anniversary of German American immigration and culture to the United States.[3] On August 6, 1987, Congress approved S.J. Resolution 108, designating October 6, 1987, as German-American Day. It became Public Law 100-104 when President Reagan signed it on August 18. A proclamation (#5719) to this effect was issued October 2, 1987, by President Reagan in a formal ceremony in the White House Rose Garden, at which time the President called on Americans to observe the Day with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

German American Day in St. Louis is sponsored by the St. Louis

German American Committee

Badischer Unterstuetzungverein Wolfgang D.. Volz 314-330-2283
German Cultural Society Monika Lorenz 314-771-8368
Deutscher Maennerchor Klemens Wolf 314-487-9296
German School Association 314-452-8780
Froeliche Schuhplattler Nancy Plunk 636-561-9051
German American Heritage Soc. Jim Martin 314-691-4189
German-American Police Officers Roland Fogt 314-691-4199
German Genealogy StL Karl Daubel 636-537-2784
Liederkranz Singing Society Norm Cleeland, Treasurer 636-225-7332
Missouri Germans Consortium Dorris Keeven-Franke* 636-221-1524
St. Charles County German Heritage Dorris Keeven-Franke* 636-221-1524
St. Charles-Ludwigsburg Sister City Mary Johnson
St. Louis Bayern Verein Ken Umhoefer 314-381-2814
St. Lous Strassenfest Patrick Worzer 314-703-1800
St. Louis Stuttgart Sister City Susanne Evens 636-530-1010
St. Louis Sturttgart Volksmarsch Donna Dasho 314-831-0726
Schuetzenverein von St. Louis Garik Allen 314-303-2302
Stammtisch-St. Louis
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Missouri Germans Consortium

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