All posts by Dorris Keeven-Franke

Public Historian, Author, Archivist and Curator.

Face of Love

SAVE THE DATE

Saturday, February 23, 2019

THE FACE OF LOVE

Symposium on the common history of the African-Americans and the German-Americans. Learn about the remarkable contributions of German emigrants to abolish slavery in Missouri and emancipate the enslaved.  With special presentations by historians and artists.

Location: German Cultural Society of St. Louis Hall, 3652 Jefferson Avenue, St. Louis, 63118

Time: 2:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Special Guests: Herbert Quelle, Consulate General of the Federal Republic of Germany, John Hayden, Police Commissioner of the City of St. Louis.

Look for further information here or at gitana-inc.org

 

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German Abolitionists

On January 1, 1863, President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation came into effect, freeing slaves in all Confederate-held territory. But Lincoln’s decree did not extend to Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Maryland, all of which were slave states that had remained loyal to the Union.

In 1864 some of the Missouri Germans backed an attempt to challenge Lincoln from the Left by nominating a Radical anti-slavery man for president. When Lincoln outflanked them by endorsing the 13th Amendment ending slavery, the Germans returned to the Republican fold and put their energies into revising the Missouri constitution to abolish slavery in their state

Legal freedom for all African Americans slaves in Missouri came by action of a state convention meeting in the Mercantile Library Hall in St. Louis. The convention convened slavessoldierson January 6, 1865 with German immigrant and abolitionist Judge Arnold Krekel serving as president. Radical Republicans, many of whom were also German-Americans, comprised two-thirds of the convention seats. A vote on the “emancipation ordinance” passed overwhelmingly 60 to 4 on January 11, 1865, with no compensation to slave owners. A month later the convention adopted the 13th amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which abolished slavery throughout the country.

Eight of the sixty-six delegates to the Missouri Constitutional Convention were born in Germany. One of the immigrants, Arnold Krekel, was elected Convention President. thWhile nearly all native-born Republicans believed that Missouri’s blacks should be freed, the status of blacks in freedom was contentious. Many thought that blacks, if they were free, should not be given the right to vote. Even among whites, women and young people under the age of 21 were not allowed to vote. One could be both a citizen and be deprived of the privilege of voting in 19th Century America.

The St. Louis Community College’s program THE GERMAN ABOLITIONISTS AND THE CIVIL WAR explores the relationships between the Germans and the enslaved community that they worked to emancipate. The program will be at the Missouri History Museum, on Tuesday, October 16, at 10:30 am in the Lee Auditorium will have speaker Dorris Keeven-Franke, Executive Director of Missouri Germans Consortium. The program is free as always and open to the public.

How German are we?

The St. Louis Metro area is considered the third largest German-American community in all of America! From the Library of Congress: “The German immigrant story is a long one—a story of early beginnings, continual growth and steadily spreading influence.” U.S. Census (2017) reports show that German is the largest ethnic group with approximately 44 Million in America who claim it as their heritage. And among the 53 U.S. metro areas with at least one million people those considered to be among the most German are Milwaukee, Minneapolis-St. Paul and St. Louis” according to Cincinnati.com who ranks fourth. Three of these: St. Louis, Milwaukee and Cincinnati are considered the German triangle of America where you will find the highest concentration. In Missouri alone 1,376,052 reported their ethnic background to be German, and we definitely know how to celebrate National German-American Day on October 6th.

High Resolution Graphic
[Source: U.S. Census Bureau]
No wonder St. Louis knows German so well! With German-American Day coming up soon, if you are looking for a family friendly way to connect with your roots, check out these three great events.  On Wednesday, October 3rd, 2018 at 7 pm at the Missouri History Museum,  the series German Heritage: History, Culture and Community opens with “What Makes Missouri So German?” with speaker Dorris Keeven-Franke. The program is at the Missouri History Museum, 5700 Lindell Blvd, 63177 in the Lee Auditorium. The program is free and open to the public.

 

On Saturday, October 6th, 2018 National German-American Day opens at the German Cultural Hall of St. Louis at 3652 Jefferson Avenue with a Fest and Feast! Join all of the St. Louis German American organizations when the hall opens at 10 am. Meet members of each of the 18 German organizations of the German American Committee and learn about their history. Then at 1 pm. the Missouri Historical Society hosts a German Feast with culinary samplings from around Germany! Take a culinary tour and sample the entire country. For more information or to make reservations for the dinner visit http://mohistory.org/events/german-american-day-fest-and-feast_1538848800 and click on the register link at the bottom or call 314-746-4599 and ask for reservations. Enjoy the music, dancing and food of the Germany. Following the Feast at 3pm will be FREE performances by St. Louis’ own Mannerchor (Men’s Choir), Dammenchor (Women’s Choir) and our own Liederkranz, the oldest combined men and women’s German singing group west of the Mississippi.

Finish your week off with “What STILL Makes St. Louis so German” and a panel discussion moderated by Dorris Keeven-Franke. Joining us will be German Consul General Herbert Quelle to share his views on the German-American Community today. He will be joined by Dr. Steven Belko of the Missouri Humanities Council sharing Missouri’s German Heritage Corridor and Susanne Evens, President of St. Louis-Stuttgart Sister Cities who will be discussing St. Louis’ Sister Cities programs. The program will be on October 10, 2018 at 7pm at the Missouri History Museum, 5700 Lindell Blvd, 63177 in the Lee Auditorium. The program is free and everyone is welcome.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related links:

German-American Day Fest and Feast: http://mohistory.org/events/german-american-day-fest-and-feast_1538848800

https://www.census.gov/newsroom/stories/2017/october/german-american.html

https://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/2018/09/20/how-german-cincinnati-region-among-top-five-among-biggest-us-metros/1359288002/