Tag Archives: Muench

Germans in the Civil War: The Muench Family

St. Louis Community College education class led by historian  Dorris Keeven-Franke, who will share the lives of the Muench family who emigrated to Missouri in 1834. Friedrich Muench was a co-founder of the Giessen Emigration Society, who served in Missouri’s State Senate from the First District during the Civil War. He was an abolitionist and was widely published. His daughter was Pauline, who left behind a journal and letters, which will also be shared. Her writings explains life for women leading up to the Civil War and their relationship with the issue of slavery. She was married to Gordian Busch who lived near Washington, Missouri and raised fourteen children. Her younger brother is Berthold,  who joined Franz Sigel’s Regiment; and who was present at the attack on Camp Jackson and the Battle at Wilson’s Creek.  The program will be at the Missouri History Museum in the Museum’s Lower Level. This event which is at 10:30 am on March 28, 2017 is free, but reservations are required. Call St. Louis Community College at (314) 984-7777.

When: Tuesday, March 28 2017 at 10:30 am
Where: Lower Level
How Much: Free
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German Abolitionists in the Civil War

German Abolitionists in the Civil War will be the subject of a talk at the Hermann Branch of the Scenic Regional Library on Monday, March 20 at 6:30 p.m. at 601 Market Street in Hermann.  Author and Executive Director of the Missouri Germans Consortium Dorris

Berthold Muench
Thousands of Germans held Missouri for the Union in the Civil War. Berthold Muench, son of Friedrich Muench, killed at the Battle of Wilsons Creek.

Keeven-Franke will share the lives of the Muench family who emigrated to Missouri in 1834. She will portray Pauline Muench Busch, who emigrated to Missouri as a 6 year old girl and member of the Giessen Emigration Society. The story is shared in their own words, diaries, journals and photos, and explains life for Germans leading up to the Civil War and their relationship with the issue of slavery. Pauline Muench,Pauline Muench Busch married Gordian Busch who lived near Washington, Missouri and raised fourteen children tells her story of what it was like to be a mother and a wife during the war.

Her younger brother is Berthold Muench, who joined Sigel’s Regiment; and who was present at the attack on Camp Jackson and the Battle at Wilson’s Creek.  She is the oldest daughter of writer “Far West” Friedrich Muench who lived at Dutzow and served in Missouri’s State Senate during the war. He was a close friend of Hermann’s Eduard Muehl and often wrote for Hermann’s newspaper the Licht freund before it closed. A radical he pushed hard for the education of the former slaves following the war, with his friend Arnold Krekel.

See the Scenic Regional Library Events page to register today! http://scenicregional.org/events/event/german-abolitionists-in-the-civil-war-hermann/?dte=2017-3-20&id=undefined

TO REGISTER TODAY  CLICK HERE or call 573-486-2024

Memorial Day

Since 1868, the United States has observed Memorial Day as a national holiday on this day.  It was originally known as Decoration Day, in honor of the Civil War’s fallen. Only on Memorial Day, the flag of the United States is raised briskly to the top of the staff and then solemnly lowered to the half-staff position, where it remains only until noon.  The flag is then raised to full-staff for the remainder of the day.

The half-staff position remembers the more than one million men and women who have given their lives in the service of the United States of America.   At noon, their memory is raised by the living, who resolve not to let their sacrifice be in vain, but to rise up in their stead and continue the fight for liberty and justice for all…Throughout our great nation’s history, German immigrants and their descendants have been instrumental in defending the values that we, as Americans, hold so dear.  Renowned Germans, such as Baron Friedrich von Steuben and General Peter Muhlenberg, were essential to our success in the American Revolutionary War.  German-Americans were the largest ethnic group to fight for the Union in the American Civil War. In Missouri, young 17-year old Berthold Muench gave his life at the Battle of Wilson’s Creek. During World War I and World War II, more than 2 million German-Americans joined the ranks in the American fight for freedom, and German-Americans have fought for the USA in every one of the nation’s conflicts.
We also salute and acknowledge the 36,691 American troops currently stationed in the Federal Republic of Germany, knowing that they will continue to strengthen the bonds of friendship and mutual security between our two democratic nations.  As we observe the holiday this weekend and honor those who have served and still serve our country, we extend a special tribute to our German-American patriots.