Tag Archives: Missouri Germans Consortium

December zeitung

Missouri Germans Consortium Newsletter  December 2018

Missouri Germans Consortium would like to wish you and yours the happiest of holidays! We invite you to the many wonderful programs that we and our friends have planned for next year.  As 2018 draws to a close, we are thankful for our many great friends, and appreciate all of those  who have blessed us this year. Please enjoy this year’s final newsletter, and feel free to share with your friends and family so that we may all enjoy and appreciate each other’s love of our rich history and heritage.

The Emancipation of Sage 

On Thursday, January 10, 2019 we invite you to join MGC and At the Mic with Bernice Bennett for Research at the National Archive and Beyond for her Blog Talk Radio show program  THE EMANCIPATION OF SAGE Use the Link in the Location to Listen ONLINE! http://www.blogtalkradio.com/bernicebennett

Background:   Imagine what it must have been like to have heard of Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation in January 1, 1863, only to be told that it did not mean you. It declared “that all persons held as slaves”within the rebel states “are, and henceforward shall be free.” The proclamation also called for the recruitment and establishment of black military units among the Union forces. An estimated 180,000 African Americans went on to serve in the army, while another 18,000 served in the navy. This clearly made the Civil War about the issues of slavery.  Missouri’s identity for Statehood was based on slavery, with its’ residents from the states of Virginia, Kentucky and Tennessee bringing thousands. The Missouri Compromise, trying to bring balance, would allow one “slave” state to join the Union, to balance every “free” state. All it really did was postpone war.

In the 1830s German immigrants had begun flooding our state. Knowing it was a slave state, they had hope that it would change.  As thousands arrived from Germany, those fleeing the failed revolutions of 1848, would become vocal and involved in government.

Germans had fled a divided overpopulated famine ravished country and watched with fear as States seceded.  Slave owners were the same feudal aristocracy,who controlled the government with their wealth. Here, they saw freedom and Democracy, and the ability to throw off the yoke of kings.

In Missouri, Germans would purchase slaves to free them, hire them, and rent them from “hard” masters to give them a better life. German newspapers fueled the struggle and informed the public. When the government enacted laws to make it illegal to teach the slaves to read or write, Germans would find ways, carefully. Slave Patrols were created just as much to catch someone in the act of “aiding and abetting a slave” as they were to catch a fleeing slave. German homes became”stops” on the Underground Railroad with wine cellars becoming hidden rooms, and church pulpits covering trapdoors. With the call to form black military units, Germans would step forward to lead as officers. Those that could not serve, women and children, filled Contraband camps, protected as best as possible by the military or hidden away. Life was becoming volatile. Homes and families’ lives were threatened.

At the beginning of January 1865, Missouri would move to change this. Calling forth a Constitutional Convention in St. Louis, they elected a German born attorney named Arnold Krekel as President of the Convention. Arnold’s father Franz, a friend of the German writer Gottfried Duden, would be one of the first to arrive in the flood of immigrants, bringing his small family in 1832. Seventeen-year-old Arnold would study English, surveying and law. He would become a State Representative and begin St. Charles’ County’s first German newspaper. And then, he would be the first one to sign, Missouri’s Emancipation Proclamation on January 11, 1865, thereby freeing all the enslaved of the state.

Gitana Productions’ “The Face of Love” symposium will explore the remarkable shared history of African Americans and German immigrants in their quest for freedom

Gitana Productions, in collaboration with the Missouri German Consortium, will explore and celebrate the remarkable contributions of German immigrants to the abolition of slavery in Missouri at The Face of Love: Symposium on the Common History of German and African Americans. Historians, community leaders and artists will come together to discuss the shared African American and Missouri German history on Saturday, February 23, 2019 from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the German Cultural Society’s Jefferson Hall at 3652 S. Jefferson Avenue. This event is free to the public.
Please register at www.gitana-inc.org.

Germans came to America in the 1800s seeking freedom from oppression in Prussia. Remarkably, many German immigrants in Missouri also fought to free oppressed African Americans. Using the lens of history, the symposium will bring to life what it means to strive for social justice for “others” while also advocating for one’s own cultural group.
The rich and shared history between Germans and African Americans in St. Louis isn’t widely known and we want to change that,” said Cecilia Nadal, executive director of Gitana Productions. “Many German immigrants, who often spoke no English, recognized that the hope for a growing democracy in America could only be realized if slavery was abolished. Often threatened and even run out of town by Missouri slaveholders, these men and women even started newspapers to spread their ideals for a color-blind democracy.”
The symposium also will explore the challenges created by contradictions in values and belief systems. While many German immigrants who settled in the Midwest before and after the Civil War staunchly defended freedom for slaves, some chose to set
aside those values to survive. Those tensions, with roots in the past, continue today within many American cultural groups.

KETC-TV “Living St. Louis” producer and reporter Ruth Ezell will moderate the symposium, with special guests Colonel John Hayden, St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department Police Commissioner, and Herbert Quelle, German Consul General.
Speakers include:
● Dr. Sydney Norton, assistant professor of German Studies at Saint Louis University and author of German Immigrant Abolitionists : Fighting for a Free Missouri
● Dorris Keeven-Franke, executive director of Missouri Germans Consortium and author of Missouri – Where the Sun of Freedom Shines in ” Utopia – Revisiting a German State in America ”
● Dr. John W. Wright, author of Discovering African American St. Louis – A Guide to Historic Sites
● Rev. Starsky Wilson, CEO and president of the Deaconess Foundation and social activist appointed in 2014 by Governor Jay Nixon to head the Ferguson Commission
Entertainment will be provided by the local German and African American communities.
In June, Gitana Productions also will present a provocative original play inspired by the amazing stories of remarkable German immigrants who became leading abolitionists in Missouri. The performances will be held Thursday, June 20 through Sunday, June 23 at Kranzberg Art Center.
For more information, visit http://www.gitana-inc.org or contact info@gitana-inc.org or 314-721-6556.
Partial funding and support for Gitana Productions are provided by the Missouri Humanities Council, Kranzberg Arts Foundation, Regional Arts Commission and Missouri Arts Council. Additional co-sponsors include Saint Louis University’s Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures and the African American Studies
Department.
ABOUT GITANA PRODUCTIONS
Gitana Productions, Inc. is a not-for-profit arts and education organization dedicated to increasing cross-cultural awareness and collaboration using music, dance and drama in the St. Louis region. Gitana events present a rarely seen diversity of international and
local artists exhibiting an array of traditional and innovative artistic expressions. Gitana also developed Global Education through the Arts, a community project that uses the arts to promote intercultural competence between youth of diverse backgrounds. For more information, visit www.gitana-inc.org or contact Gitana Productions at (314) 721-6556.


MISSOURI GERMANS CONSORTIUM
eMail: missourigermans@gmail.com

Dorris Keeven-Franke, Executive Director

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German American Day 2018

Join us for this family friendly week of programs that celebrate the St. Louis region’s wonderful German-American heritage with several programs, events, and even a feast as we celebrate German American Day in the St. Louis region! Don’t worry… there will be some German beer, brats and music as no German celebration is complete without them!

German-Americans: History, Culture and Community

Germans have been part of America’s history since 1683, when a group of immigrants, thirteen families, from Krelfeld landed at Philadelphia, and founded Germantown, Pennsylvania. In 1688, they filed the first petition ever written, to abolish slavery, in the colonies. In 1883, German Americans in Philadelphia, began to celebrate this heritage with Deutsch-Amerikanischer Tag or German American Day. This spread throughout the United States, and every German-American community would also use this day to honor this heritage. This tradition has even survived the anti-German sentiment of World War I and II. And, in 1983, President Ronald Reagan proclaimed October 6, 1983 officially German-American Day.

In St. Louis, Missouri, one of the largest strongholds of German-American heritage, the German-American Committee of St. Louis, was officially founded. We work to preserve, educate and promote the German-American heritage of St. Louis. Please join us at the following events:

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  • Oct 3 –  Germans in St. Louis: History, Culture, Community – What Makes Missouri So German?  Missouri’s German roots run deep, but why? What were the driving forces behind German emigration, and why did so many Germans end up in our region? Join Dorris Keeven-Franke, Missouri Germans Consortium, for a look at the earliest waves of German settlers in Missouri, from the early 1800s through the Civil War. This program is free and takes place at the Missouri History Museum, at 7pm in the Lee Auditorium. This event kicks off a week long celebration of Everything German in Missouri.
  • gadaysmallOct 6 GERMAN AMERICAN DAY = FEST & FEAST 

  • Start by soaking up the culture and heritage of Missouri’s German American community, then enjoy an afternoon feast highlighting the culinary specialties of Germany!
    This event opens at the German Cultural Society of St. Louis at 3652 S. Jefferson Ave., 63118 when the Hall opens at 10 am. Visit the hall and meet representatives of all 18 active German-American organizations in the St. Louis region. The Fest is free and is open until 4pm!  The Feast begins at 1pm and is a delicious German meal and is $25 per person (or $20 for MHS members) and registration is required at mohistory.org/german. There will be lots of German entertainment and celebration throughout the day! See Missouri History Museum events for more information and to Register for the dinner

Join us for a festival of German organizations! Meet and Greet the 18 German Organizations of the St. Louis Region and learn more about how you can become more involved and connect with your heritage!

Fest and feast your way through German American Day! Start by soaking up the culture and heritage of Missouri Germans, then enjoy an afternoon feast highlighting the culinary specialties of Germany!

10 AM-4PM VISIT The German American Organizations of St. Louis and learn how you can know more.

1PM – FEAST WITH THE MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM – The Feast is $25 per person (or $20 for MHS members) and registration is required at mohistory.org/german. Entertainment

3PM-5PM ENJOY The musical talents of our Liederkranz, Mannerchor, and Damenchor will entertain you.

  • Oct 10 What STILL Makes Missouri so German – Missouri Germans Consortium – This Panel will include Consul General Herbert Quelle, Dr. Steve Belko, and others. It explores the German-American culture and community of today –  the topics will include the German Heritage Corridor, Sister Cities and German Language Initiatives, and more. This event is free and takes place takes place at the Missouri History Museum

This series is presented by The German American Committee of St. Louis, the Missouri Historical Society, and the Missouri Germans Consortium.  Please visit one of our websites for more information:

GermanAmerican Committee of St. Louis

Missouri Historical Society

MissouriGermans Consortium

Die Zeitung: October Newsletter

Zeitung

October 3, 2016

October is the month when you can almost find an Oktoberfest around every corner. Here are some other events happening in Missouri that you may also find interesting!  We hope that you are able to attend some of these very interesting programs. Don’t forget to look for Missouri Germans when you do!

October 3rd, 2016  Day of German Unity! A National holiday in Germany, with 2016 being the 26th Anniversary.

October 5, 2016 Wednesday– 7pm- St. Charles County German Heritage Society – Stegton Regency  Banquet Center (1450 Wall Street) Speaker Dorris Keeven-Franke will share the German Heritage Corridor – an initiative of the Missouri Humanities Council.  Keeven-Franke will explain the history of the corridor and what the plans for the future are.

October 6, 2016German-American Day is a National holiday in the U.S. observed annually on October 6 each year,   which celebrates the German-American heritage. This day commemorates the date in 1683 when 13 German families from Krefeld near the Rhine, landed in Philadelphia.  Those families subsequently founded Germantown, Pennsylvania, the first German settlement and organized the 1st petition in the colonies to abolish slavery in 1688. Originally just “German Day”, the holiday was celebrated for the first time in Philadelphia in 1883, on the occasion of the 200th anniversary of the arrival of the settlers from Krefeld; and similar celebrations developed across the country.The custom died out during World War due to the anti-German hysteria that prevailed at the time.  The custom was revived in 1983, when President Reagan proclaimed October 6 as German-American Day to celebrate and honor the 300th anniversary of German-American immigration and culture to the United States.

October 8, 2016 Saturday – 7:30 pm Deutscher Mannerchor Annual Fall Concert and Dance St. Louis German Cultural Society Hall 3652 Jefferson Dance music by the Wendl Band.

October 15 & 16, 2016 Saturday and Sunday – 9am-5pm  Deutsch Country Days A Living History Weekend at the Historic Luxenhaus Farm on 18055 State Hwy O. This is the 35th year that the Luxenhaus Farm has come to life, sharing the folkways and skills of the early Germans in Missouri. Spend a beautiful autumn weekend visiting with artisans from across the country that come together to share the story of our early German immigrants and pioneers. This is a wonderful educational event for the entire family. Some demonstrators do have their beautiful handcrafted items for sale as well so you can begin your Christmas shopping too – with items we guarantee you won’t find online! Visit with Oma (Grandma) Huber (Dorris Keeven-Franke) on her front porch as she shares the history of these early Germans, and to learn more about the Luxenhaus farm and its fascinating history. For more information visit www.deutschcountrydays.org or call 636-433-5669.

 October 27, 2016 Thursday 6:30 pm – Maplewood Public Library – 7550 Lohmeyer Maplewood, Mo. 63143 314-781-2174 http://www.maplewood.lib.mo.us Exploring Missouri’s German Heritage: Stories from the German Heritage Corridor  From the first Germans to follow Gottfried Duden, and the German Abolitionist Muench family to the traditions and customs that enrich our communities today, Missouri’s largest ethnic group celebrates its history. Hear the stories of those that came, like Minna Bock Morsey. Minna came to Missouri in 1834, after her father the Baron von Bock founded Dutzow in 1832, the first German settlement in Missouri. She married Col. Fredrick Morsey, who guarded the Missouri railroad during  the Civil War. Thousands of Germans worked to save Missouri from the Confederates and keep it for the Union. To download a PDF click on this link:  german-heritage-corridor-program-flyer-october-2016-1

October 30, 2016 Sunday – 2pm – Missouri History Museum – Lee Auditorium – Refugee Resettlement: Best Practices in St. Louis and Germany

Experts from Germany and St. Louis have been participating in an exchange to learn from each other about successful refugee resettlement and immigration integration. Attend this town hall meeting for presentations and roundtable discussions with Dr. Yemi Akande-Bartsch, president of FOCUS St. Louis; Betsy Cohen, executive director of the St. Louis Mosaic Project; Anna Crosslin, president of the International Institute of St. Louis; and Dr. Frances Levine, president of the Missouri Historical Society. This is program is presented in partnership with the International Institute of St. Louis and the Mosaic Project. Download a PDF refugeeresettlement_oct_pdf_90697

For more information visit us on Facebook! at  https://www.facebook.com/mo.germans/ You can also email us at MissouriGermans@gmail.com anytime!